Only The Dead Have Seen The End Of War

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Only The Dead Have Seen The End Of War

995.00

This Triptych is available exclusively from Art of Protest Gallery.

50 X 50 cm

ED./25

Signed by the artist.

Framing available to UK clients, please contact the gallery for information.

Only the Dead Have Seen the End of War

Working with Magnus since Art of Protest York opened, we have always discussed and hoped we could collaborate to create something exclusively for our collectors. The triptych "Only the Dead Have Seen the End of War" is the piece we have been waiting for.
This very special work combines our belief in the value of protest with his beautiful visual language. Skulls occur throughout Magnus’ work as a reminder of the preciousness of life and living for today. This striking triptych of 3 skulls uses a battle scene of Marlborough’s victory at Ramillies to connect us to the temporary nature of everything. Change is the only constant. Wars, whether 100, or 2000 years ago, are the ultimate protest in human history, and through art we celebrate the beautiful life these protests contrast with. 100 years on from The Great War and in amongst our modern turmoil’s art is the route to a calmer place.
The title adorns war memorials, books, films and now fine art; often attributed to Plato and famously spoken by MacArthur, the uncanny beauty of Magnus' work is perfect for contemplation in any contemporary home which celebrates life.  


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Exclusive Release Art of Protest - Magnus Gjoen

 

Only the Dead Have Seen the End of War

Working with Magnus since Art of Protest York opened, we have always discussed and hoped we could collaborate to create something exclusively for our collectors. The triptych "Only the Dead Have Seen the End of War" is the piece we have been waiting for.

This very special work combines our belief in the value of protest with his beautiful visual language. Skulls occur throughout Magnus’ work as a reminder of the preciousness of life and living for today. This striking triptych of 3 skulls uses a battle scene of Marlborough’s victory at Ramillies to connect us to the temporary nature of everything. Change is the only constant. Wars, whether 100, or 2000 years ago, are the ultimate protest in human history, and through art we celebrate the beautiful life these protests contrast with. 100 years on from The Great War and in amongst our modern turmoil’s art is the route to a calmer place.

The title adorns war memorials, books, films and now fine art; often attributed to Plato and famously spoken by MacArthur, the uncanny beauty of Magnus' work is perfect for contemplation in any contemporary home which celebrates life.  

Battle of Ramillies, (May 23, 1706), victory won by Allied (Anglo-Dutch) forces led by the Duke of Marlborough over the French during the War of the Spanish Succession. The victory led to the Allied capture of the whole north and east of the Spanish Netherlands.

The battle was fought at the village of Ramillies, 13 miles north of Namur (in modern Belgium), between a 62,000-man Allied army under Marlborough and a 60,000-man French army under François de Neufville, Duke de Villeroi. Under express orders from Louis XIV to seek battle, the French reached the plain of Ramillies ahead of the Allies but deployed unwisely along the entire length of a 4-mile (6.5-kilometre) ridge, the centre of which was at the villages of Ramillies and Offus. A strong Allied attack on the French left forced Villeroi to shift reinforcements from his centre. Marlborough, however, called off this attack because the marshy ground would not permit cavalry support. Half of the battalions from this wing then marched, undetected by the French, to the centre to support the final concentrated Allied assault. This smashed the overextended French army. The French lost about 17,000 killed, wounded, or captured and by the next morning were thoroughly dispersed. Allied losses numbered about 5,000 killed and wounded. Although many towns fell to the Allies in the succeeding weeks, their advance came to a halt when they reached better-fortified and well-garrisoned towns farther south. The seemingly decisive victory did not lead to a peace settlement.